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Decentralization, Clientelism and Popular Participation-- Is there a role for ICTs to improve local governance? | Publications | Georgetown University Georgetown University home page Search: Full text search Site Index: Find a web site by name or keyword Site Map: Overview of main pages Directory: Find a person; contact us About this site: Copyright, disclaimer, policies, terms of use Georgetown University home page Home page for prospective students Home page for current students Home page for alumni and alumnae Home page for family and friends Home page for faculty and staff Georgetown University Search: Full text search Site Index: Find a web site by name or keyword Site Map: Overview of main pages Directory: Find a person; contact us About this site: Copyright, disclaimer, policies, terms of use
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Decentralization, Clientelism and Popular Participation-- Is there a role for ICTs to improve local governance?

Bjorn-Soren Gigler. "Decentralization, Clientelism and Popular Participation-- Is there a role for ICTs to improve local governance?." 3rd International Conference on Information and Communication ICTD 2009 Proceedings, Carnegie Mellon University. Carnegie Mellon University, Education City, Doha, Qatar: Carnegie Mellon University, 2009.

This case study investigates under which conditions ICTs can play a role in fostering the empowerment of rural communities to fully participate in the decision-making processes of local governments. The analysis using empirical evidence from rural communities in Bolivia focuses hereby on the following key questions: i) to what extent can ICTs contribute to improving the efficiency and efficacy of local government? ii) does ICTs have the potential to make local governments more transparent and responsive to the needs of rural communities and iii) can ICTs support the core objectives of the Bolivian Law of Popular Participation to strengthen the role of local government in public-policy making and the implementation of development programs? The article explores these issues using empirical evidence of rural municipalities in Bolivia that have participated in the USAID-funded project Enlared Municipal.

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