Michele L Swers

Title

Professor

Department

Department of Government
In the news

In the news

  • “Political leadership qualities like being strong, direct and tough are considered male qualities. Women face a double bind in that you need to show yourself as tough and confident but still retain feminine qualities without appearing weak,” Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on how voters react to women candidates. What keeps women from running for top elected offices? October 10, 2013, The Washington Post
  • “Research indicates that gridlock becomes worse when the ideological distance between the House and Senate increases and when there are fewer moderates to broker deals between the two parties,” Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on reasons for the U.S. government shutdown. The increasing ideological polarization of the Republican and Democratic parties has led to the U.S. government’s shut-down October 1, 2013, London School of Economics
  • “There isn’t among the women in the Senate, anyone that is that strongly and stridently ideological that’s looking to push the envelope that way and make that kind of political point,” Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on the effects of increasing numbers of women in the U.S. Senate. Women vs. men: Who governs better? July 23, 2013, Minnesota Public Radio
  • “[still], That’s not where you’re going to find the real impact of diversifying. The main impact is in the policies they’re pushing,” Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on how females in the Senate may be more likely than males to bond with each other and with constituents. Do Women Make Better Senators Than Men? July 11, 2013, National Journal
  • “In terms of utilizing their gender, they do emphasize it if it helps them to achieve their political goals and they de-emphasize it when they’re concerned that it could hurt their political goals,” Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on the impact of gender differences in the US Senate. After Words: Michele Swers, “Women in the Club: Gender and Policy Making in the Senate” July 6, 2013, C-SPAN Book TV
  • "He basically has a year for major legislative accomplishments because after the first year you get into the mid-term elections, which will partially be a referendum on his presidency." Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on President Obama's narrow window to push through policy priorities. In speech, Obama to challenge divided Congress to back his proposals February 12, 2013, Reuters
  • "I think clearly the purpose was to thank [Hillary Clinton] for being Secretary of State but also to elevate her because everyone knows that she's considered the front runner for 2016, and the fact that she agreed to it means that she's not ruling that out." Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on the purpose of Hillary Clinton and President Obama's joint '60 Minutes' interview. Is Hillary Clinton Laying the Groundwork for Election 2016? January 28, 2013, WSJ Live
  • "Republicans don't have an incredibly deep bench of women who you would think are in the type of positions that would lead someone to become vice president. There haven't been a ton of Republican women governors; there's not a lot of Republican women in Congress." Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on why it's unlikely that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney will select a woman as his running mate. Not this time July 17, 2012, The Hill
  • “Romney is in Bob Dole territory when it comes to the gender gap.” Michele Swers, associate professor of government, on Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's current position with women voters. 'Mommy wars' highlight fierce battle for women voters April 13, 2012, MSNBC