Judy Huei-yu Wang

Title

Tenure Line -- Associate Professor
Associate Professor

Department

Population Sciences
Research

Research

Her current research examines culture and cancer survivorship, health disparities in cancer care, Hepatitis C primary care, non-pharmacological intervention and fatigue, and culturally appropriate health communication, and cancer screening.

Study title: Acupressure Intervention to Improve Fatigue and Physical Functioning of Chinese Immigrant Breast Cancer

This study examines the acceptability, feasibility, and fidelity of implementing self-acupressure intervention in in improving Chinese breast cancer survivors’ fatigue and physical functioning relative to usual care.


Study title: Participation and Satisfaction with Treatment Decision Making among Chinese American and Non-Hispanic White Women with Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer

This study investigates cultural influence on communication about treatment decision-making and satisfaction of care among Chinese and White breast cancer patients.


Study title: knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of chronic liver diseases.

This study investigates Hepatitis C screening, testing, and management from primary care physicians’ and patients' perspectives.


Study title: Cultural Impact on Adaptation between Chinese and White Breast Cancer Survivors

This study investigates cultural influence on physician-patient communication, stress-coping processes and health-related quality of life between Chinese and White breast cancer survivors.


Study title: A RCT to Promote Mammography adherence among Chinese Immigrant Women

This research project aims to identify the most effective approach in increasing adherence to mammography screening and decreasing barriers to screening among Chinese immigrant women.


Study title: A Physician-Based Trial to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening in Chinese

The goal of this study is to reduce colorectal (CRC) cancer disparities in Chinese Americans by increasing CRC cancer screening rates among non-adherent Chinese patients receiving care from Chinese primary care physicians. This study is one of the first to focus on culturally appropriate physician-based interventions to improve Chinese American’s CRC cancer screening behaviors.