Abigail A Marsh

Title

Associate Professor

Department

Department of Psychology
In the news

In the news

  • “Fear is the expectation or the anticipation of possible harm. We know that the body is highly sensitive to the possibility of threat, so there are multiple pathways that bring that fear information into the brain," Abigail Marsh, assistant professor of psychology, on what is happening in the brain when we feel fear. 'Chemistry Of Fear' VIDEO Explains Science Behind Brain's Response To Dangerous Situations October 29, 2013, The Huffington Post
  • “Fear is the expectation or the anticipation of possible harm ... We know that the body is highly sensitive to the possibility of threat, so there are multiple pathways that bring that fear information into the brain.” Abigail Marsh, assistant professor of psychology, on how the brain processes fear. The chemistry of fear explained October 29, 2013, Fox News
  • "As many as half of all violent offenders may be psychopaths, meaning they show little empathy or remorse and are likely to reoffend. Normally a diagnosis of psychopathy is an aggravating factor that results in a longer sentence. But emphasizing the biological basis of the disorder can reduce even psychopaths' sentences." Abigail Marsh, assistant professor of psychology, on the complexity of introducing biological evidence of psychopathy into courts of law. Less Guilty by Reason of Neurological Defect October 22, 2012, Slate
  • Slate Magazine cites assistant professor of psychology Abigail Marsh's research on facial expressions to examine the facial expressions of Olympian athletes of different nationalities. Can You Guess These Athletes' Nationalities? July 26, 2012, Slate