Georgetown University home page Search: Full text search Site Index: Find a web site by name or keyword Site Map: Overview of main pages Directory: Find a person; contact us About this site: Copyright, disclaimer, policies, terms of use Georgetown University home page Home page for prospective students Home page for current students Home page for alumni and alumnae Home page for family and friends Home page for faculty and staff Georgetown University Search: Full text search Site Index: Find a web site by name or keyword Site Map: Overview of main pages Directory: Find a person; contact us About this site: Copyright, disclaimer, policies, terms of use
Navigation bar Navigation bar
spacer spacer spacer spacer
border
spacer spacer spacer
border
spacer spacer

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 18, 2011


CONTACT:

Karen Mallet (media only)
215-514-9751
km463@georgetown.edu


New Treatment Regimen Shows Clinical Benefit in Advanced Colon Cancer

Treatment was beneficial despite resistance to all standard therapeutic approaches.


Washington, DC -- A new treatment regimen for patients with metastatic colon cancer appears to offer clinical benefit even when used after multiple other treatments have failed, say research physicians at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, a part of Georgetown University Medical Center.

The research team found that combining a PARP inhibitor with chemotherapy (temozolomide) offers significant benefit in patients who had no further treatment options. However, the study is small, and does not include a comparison arm, so further investigation is needed, they add. The study will be presented in an oral session on Saturday, June 4th, at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

PARP, short for “poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase” is a key part of a cell’s DNA repair apparatus, and is important for protecting our normal cells against DNA damage. However, cancer cells become resistant to chemotherapy in part by increasing PARP expression and thus rapidly repairing DNA damage intentionally caused by chemotherapy. PARP inhibitors are designed to overcome a cancer cell’s ability to repair the damaged DNA. (They are showing promise in both breast and ovarian cancers, and are being studied in a variety of other cancer types).

In this clinical study, doctors administered a potent DNA-damaging chemotherapy, temozolomide, with a PARP inhibitor called ABT-888. The theory is that ABT-888 will diminish the ability of these cancer cells to fix the damage that was just inflicted by the temozolomide, pushing the cancer into a death spiral.

“This is a classic one-two punch: the chemotherapy damages the cancer cells and the PARP inhibitor prevents it from fixing itself, leaving the cell to die,” says lead author, Michael Pishvaian, MD, PhD, an assistant professor at Georgetown Lombardi.

This single-arm, phase II study enrolled 49 patients with metastatic disease who were not eligible for surgery and had exhausted all of the standard therapies currently used. Despite having advanced cancer, all study participants were still active at work or home. Researchers found the drug combination controlled cancer growth for nearly six months in 23 percent of the patients, with two patients having a significant reduction in their tumor burden (partial response).

Pishvaian explains, “The treatment was extremely well tolerated, so to have a period of six months with no tumor growth, but also no significant side effects was really meaningful for the patients.”

In addition, researchers were able to collect samples of the patients’ tumors for further molecular analysis. “By testing tissue samples and identifying their molecular fingerprints, perhaps we can identify which patient subgroups are most likely to respond to this new therapeutic combination,” concludes Pishvaian.

Funding for this study was provided by the Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Abbott provided the study drugs at no charge. Pishvaian reports no personal financial interests related to the study.

About Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center
Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of Georgetown University Medical Center and Georgetown University Hospital, seeks to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer through innovative basic and clinical research, patient care, community education and outreach, and the training of cancer specialists of the future. Lombardi is one of only 40 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute, and the only one in the Washington, DC, area. For more information, go to http://lombardi.georgetown.edu.

About Georgetown University Medical Center
Georgetown University Medical Center is an internationally recognized academic medical center with a three-part mission of research, teaching and patient care (through MedStar Health). GUMC’s mission is carried out with a strong emphasis on public service and a dedication to the Catholic, Jesuit principle of cura personalis -- or "care of the whole person." The Medical Center includes the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing & Health Studies, both nationally ranked; Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, designated as a comprehensive cancer center by the National Cancer Institute; and the Biomedical Graduate Research Organization (BGRO), which accounts for the majority of externally funded research at GUMC including a Clinical Translation and Science Award from the National Institutes of Health. In fiscal year 2009-2010, GUMC accounted for nearly 80 percent of Georgetown University's extramural research funding.


###





spacer spacer
Navigation bar Navigation bar