FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 10, 2006


CONTACT:

Becky Julie Wexler
202-687-5100
rjw43@georgetown.edu


GUMC to Host First-Ever Regional Childhood Cancer Survivors Conference


Washington, DC—Survivors of childhood cancer and their families know that despite their victory over a killer disease, the physical and psychological effects of their ordeal are likely to remain into young adulthood and beyond. In just a few weeks, the growing community of young adult cancer survivors will gather at Georgetown University for the first-ever regional late-effects conference to share stories, hear from medical experts, and help each other make sense of what can be an intimidating and confusing post-cancer treatment world. 

 

“The fact that we are even having a gathering like this is a testament to the skyrocketing survival rate for pediatric cancer patients," said Aziza Shad, MD, director of pediatric hematology and oncology at Lombardi and founder of Lombardi’s Late Effects Clinic for Cancer Survivors. "These young people have been through something that will change the course of the rest of their life, and we want to help them confront some of the challenges--both medical and non-medical--that lie ahead."

 

Rise to Action—Washington, DC will address the unique needs of young adult survivors of childhood cancer and their families, covering topics such as ensuring proper follow-up health care, fertility concerns, health insurance, employment issues and patient advocacy. An exhibit hall will showcase local and national cancer organizations and the programs and services they provide. The conference is being presented by the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University, the Children’s Cause for Cancer Advocacy and Special Love for Children with Cancer.

 

Research shows that having cancer can have a significant impact on obtaining and retaining health insurance, education, and employment opportunities. Studies also indicate that as many as two-thirds of childhood cancer survivors are likely to experience at least one “late effect”—or adverse outcome—as a result of cancer and/or treatment. These late effects can include learning disabilities, heart disease, infertility, or a higher risk for a second cancer. Some can be treated effectively if detected early and some may not appear until many years after treatment.

 

Rise to Action—Washington, DC will take place on Saturday, October 21, from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Sunday, October 22, from 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the Georgetown University Conference Hotel, 3800 Reservoir Road NW, Washington, DC 20057. Attendance is free, but registration is required. Visit http://work.mightyspark.com/ccca/index.php to register. [Media may register by contacting Becky Wexler at (202) 687-5100 or rjw43@georgetown.edu.]

 

About Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center
The Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of Georgetown University Medical Center and Georgetown University Hospital, seeks to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer through innovative basic and clinical research, patient care, community education and outreach, and the training of cancer specialists of the future. Lombardi is one of only 40 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute, and the only one in the Washington, DC, area. For more information, go to http://lombardi.georgetown.edu.

 

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